This entry is part 1 of 5 in the series Travelling in LLVM land

I have tried to find the proper receipts to compile on the fly C++ code with clang and LLVM. It’s actually not that easy to achieve if you are not targeting LLVM Intermediate Representation, and unfortunately, the code here, working for LLVM 7, may not work for LLVM 8. Or 6.

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This entry is part 2 of 5 in the series Analog modelling

After my previous post on SPICE modelling in Python, I need to use a good support example to go up to on the fly compilation in C++. This schema will also require some changes to support more than simple nodal analysis, so this now becomes Modified Nodal Analysis with state equations.

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Address Sanitizer: alternative to valgrind

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This entry is part 2 of 5 in the series Travelling in LLVM land

Recently, at work, I encountered a strange bug with GCC 7.2 and clang 6 (I didn’t test it with Visual Studio 2017 for different reasons). The bug was not visible on “old” compilers like gcc 4, Visual Studio 2013 or even Intel Compiler 2017. In debug mode, everything was fine, but in release mode, the application crashed. But not always at the same location.

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I’m happy to announce the update of ATK Side-Chain Compressor based on the Audio Toolkit and JUCE. It is available on Windows (AVX compatible processors) and OS X (min. 10.9, SSE4.2) in different formats.

This update changes storage format and allows linked channels to be steered by a mix of power coming from each channel, each passing through its own attack-release filter. It enables more creative workflows with makeup gain specific to each channel. The rest of the plugin works as before, with an optional Middle/Side processing as well as side-chain working either on each channel separately or in middle/side.

This plugin requires the universal runtime on Windows, which is automatically deployed with Windows update (see tis discussion on the JUCE forum). If you don’t have it installed, please check Microsoft website.

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I work on a day-to-day basis on a big project that has many developers with different C++ level. Scott Meyers wrote a wonderful book on modern C++ (that I still need to review one day, especially since there is a new Effective Modern C++), but it is not for beginners. So I’m looking for that rare book with modern C++ and an explanation of good practices.

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This entry is part 5 of 5 in the series Travelling in LLVM land

LLVM has always intrigued me. Actually, I always thought about one day writing a compiler. But it was more a challenge than a requirement for any of my works, private or professional, so never dived into it. The design of LLVM was also very well thought, and probably close to something I would have had liked to create.

So now the easiest is just to use LLVM for the different goals I want to achieve. I recently had to write clang-tidy rules, and I also want to perhaps create a JIT for Audio Toolkit and the modeling libraries. So lots of reasons to look at LLVM.

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This entry is part 4 of 5 in the series Travelling in LLVM land

I started taking a heavier interest in clang-tidy a few months ago, as I was looking at static analyzers. I found at the time that it was quite complicated to work on clang internal AST. It is a wonderful tool, but it is also a very complex one. Thankfully, the cfe-dev mailing list is full of nice people.

I also started my journey in the LLVM/clang land with the help of this blog post.

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This entry is part 3 of 3 in the series Playing with a Bela

More than a year ago, I started playing with the Bela board. At the time, I had issues compiling Audio ToolKit with clang. The issue was that the gcc shipped with the Debian image the BeagleBoard used was too old and didn’t fully support C++11. The one that ships now is GCC 6, which is even C++14 compliant. Meaning that everything is available to build Audio Toolkit with Python support.

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I’m happy to announce the update of ATK Auto Swell based on the Audio Toolkit and JUCE. It is available on Windows (AVX compatible processors) and OS X (min. 10.9, SSE4.2) in different formats.

This plugin requires the universal runtime on Windows, which is automatically deployed with Windows update (see tis discussion on the JUCE forum). If you don’t have it installed, please check Microsoft website.

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ATK is updated to 2.3.0 with major fixes and code coverage improvement (see here). Lots of bugs were fixed during that effort and native build on embedded platforms was also fixed.

CMake builds on Linux don’t have to be installed before Python tests have to be ran. SIMD filters are now also easier to implement.

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