Category Archives: Book review

I often read scientific books written in English. Are they worth it ? I propose some reviews…

Book review: Google Analytics 2.0

I’m a very curious guy, and I wanted to know who is looking at my blog, and for my wife, who is interested by what is viewed on her decoration site (in construction as she wants to make a living of decoration advice). With my hosting service, I have access to Awstats, but Google Analytics seems better suited for data analysis. And this is what this book explains.
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Book review: Fortran 90/95 for Scientists and Engineers

When I started my new job three months ago, I didn’t know how to write a Fortran program. I had to modify an already existign Fortran 77 program to enhance and parallelize it. So I went to the library and I took this book aimed at people like me.
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Book review: Programming Collective Intelligence: Building Smart Web 2.0 Applications

The book description was really appetizing: Machine Learning applied to the Internet, so it should be easy to understand, and Python as the mean to compute. Unfortunately, contrary to what I saw in different reviews, I was not pleased with the book, and here is why.
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Book review: Fundamentals of Geophysics

This is the first time I will review a book on something I’m not familiar with at all. I’ve started now for more than two months a new job related to geophysics, and I had to catch up with my colleagues.
I’ve stopped studying geology ten years ago, so this is a review from someone who is learning geophysics and who wants to have a quick and global look on the different fields of geophysics.
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Book review: An Introduction to Design Patterns in C++ with Qt4

Contrary to what the title may hint to, this book is an introduction to C++ and the Qt library. And in the process, the authors tried to teach some good practices through design patterns. So if you’re a good C++ or Qt programer, this book is not for you. If you’re a beginner, the answer is in my review.

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Book review: Beautiful Code: Leading Programmers Explain How They Think

I got this book from a partnership between http://www.developpez.com/ and O’Reilly. Thanks to both of them.

What defines “beautiful code”? How do people think a beautiful code should look like? This isn’t a simple question to answer, so this book asked several lead programmers (Ruby, Python, C, C++, Java, Perl, …) some beautiful code they wrote or they encountered. And if some want to answer “think about a robust, simple to extend code and that will be it” (and I would be one of them before I read the book), there are some code that would not fit this profile.
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Book review: Intel Threading Building Blocks: Outfitting C++ for Multi-core Processor Parallelism

After some general books on grid computation, I needed to change the subject of my readings a little bit. As Intel Threading Building Blocks always intrigued me, I chose the associated book.
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Book review: Peer-to-Peer: Harnessing the Power of Disruptive Technologies

Peer-to-peer. These words are unleashing in France a fight between the legislators and the developers. And this old – I say old because it was written in 2001, and 7 years is old for a book on this topic – book presented me the issues debated in journals, blogs, … in a new way.
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Book review: From P2P to Web Services and Grids: Peers In A Client/Server World

I was looking for an introductory book on peer-to-peer (P2P) application and their application to grid computation. Web services was a bonus, as it is something I don’t usually play with.
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