This entry is part 2 of 5 in the series Analog modelling

After my previous post on SPICE modelling in Python, I need to use a good support example to go up to on the fly compilation in C++. This schema will also require some changes to support more than simple nodal analysis, so this now becomes Modified Nodal Analysis with state equations.

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I’m happy to announce the update of ATK Side-Chain Compressor based on the Audio Toolkit and JUCE. It is available on Windows (AVX compatible processors) and OS X (min. 10.9, SSE4.2) in different formats.

This update changes storage format and allows linked channels to be steered by a mix of power coming from each channel, each passing through its own attack-release filter. It enables more creative workflows with makeup gain specific to each channel. The rest of the plugin works as before, with an optional Middle/Side processing as well as side-chain working either on each channel separately or in middle/side.

This plugin requires the universal runtime on Windows, which is automatically deployed with Windows update (see tis discussion on the JUCE forum). If you don’t have it installed, please check Microsoft website.

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This entry is part 3 of 3 in the series Playing with a Bela

More than a year ago, I started playing with the Bela board. At the time, I had issues compiling Audio ToolKit with clang. The issue was that the gcc shipped with the Debian image the BeagleBoard used was too old and didn’t fully support C++11. The one that ships now is GCC 6, which is even C++14 compliant. Meaning that everything is available to build Audio Toolkit with Python support.

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I’m happy to announce the update of ATK Auto Swell based on the Audio Toolkit and JUCE. It is available on Windows (AVX compatible processors) and OS X (min. 10.9, SSE4.2) in different formats.

This plugin requires the universal runtime on Windows, which is automatically deployed with Windows update (see tis discussion on the JUCE forum). If you don’t have it installed, please check Microsoft website.

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ATK is updated to 2.3.0 with major fixes and code coverage improvement (see here). Lots of bugs were fixed during that effort and native build on embedded platforms was also fixed.

CMake builds on Linux don’t have to be installed before Python tests have to be ran. SIMD filters are now also easier to implement.

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I’m happy to announce the update of ATK Colored Expander based on the Audio Toolkit and JUCE. They are available on Windows (AVX compatible processors) and OS X (min. 10.9, SSE4.2) in different formats.

This plugin requires the universal runtime on Windows, which is automatically deployed with Windows update (see tis discussion on the JUCE forum). If you don’t have it installed, please check Microsoft website.

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ATK is updated to 2.2.0 with the major introduction of vectorized filters. This means that some filters (EQ for now) can use vectorization for maximum performance. More filters will be introduced later as well as the Python support. Vector lanes of size 4 and 8 are supported as well as instruction sets from SSE2 to AVX512.

This is also the first major release that officially supports the JUCE framework. This means that ATK can be added as modules (directly source code without requiring any binaries) in the Projucer. The caveat is that SIMD filters are not available in this configuration due to the requirement for CMake support to build the SIMD filters.

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When I started music almost thirty years ago, one of my music teachers told us that there was a difference between a flat and a sharp note. I didn’t really understand as on a trumpet, both would be the same! I forgot about it, until a few years ago, I was introduced ti the concept of temperament.

It started with he fact that the fifth in a scale has a mathematical relationship to the root note, and all other notes were built from there. At least for the 12 notes we have in the occidental world. Then, I read that at some point, this imperfect scale was replaced by another one, where all 12 notes were evenly split. Of course, that means that the fifth is not the fifth anymore…

Then, I watched a French video on it again, with the proper scientific explanation for different scales, and it got me thinking again. That was what my music teacher was talking about. If you build your scale with the harmonics, you end up with a difference between flats and sharps. But even more, I thought that a melody with flats was more melancholic than one with sharps. But this doesn’t make sense for an evenly tempered scale! They all feel the same way, no matter which scale you use. It’s only if you do like Bach and use an imperfect temperament that you can feel a difference.

So then a musical instrument like strings, or voices, can actually work in a pure temperament. For winds, you can work on adjusting notes on the fly, and also have kind of pure temperament. On a piano, you can’t, you need to tune it right (BTW, I still don’t know how piano tuners can tune pianos when you have to tune them “imperfectly”! Their job is just amazing), or it will feel different from with a symphonic orchestra that can use a pure temperament of any scale.

And this is something quite difficult to achieve with a digital instrument. We expect equal temperament. I wonder how Celemony handles these differences when they tune a voice track.

Anyway, maybe the pure scale is imperfect because the 13th note is not exactly the same of the original note, maybe the equal temperament makes everything similar, but they all bring something. We shouldn’t probably forget about these differences and use them in modern music as well.