Address Sanitizer: alternative to valgrind

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This entry is part 1 of 4 in the series Travelling in LLVM land

Recently, at work, I encountered a strange bug with GCC 7.2 and clang 6 (I didn’t test it with Visual Studio 2017 for different reasons). The bug was not visible on “old” compilers like gcc 4, Visual Studio 2013 or even Intel Compiler 2017. In debug mode, everything was fine, but in release mode, the application crashed. But not always at the same location.

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This entry is part 4 of 4 in the series Travelling in LLVM land

LLVM has always intrigued me. Actually, I always thought about one day writing a compiler. But it was more a challenge than a requirement for any of my works, private or professional, so never dived into it. The design of LLVM was also very well thought, and probably close to something I would have had liked to create.

So now the easiest is just to use LLVM for the different goals I want to achieve. I recently had to write clang-tidy rules, and I also want to perhaps create a JIT for Audio Toolkit and the modeling libraries. So lots of reasons to look at LLVM.

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This entry is part 3 of 4 in the series Travelling in LLVM land

I started taking a heavier interest in clang-tidy a few months ago, as I was looking at static analyzers. I found at the time that it was quite complicated to work on clang internal AST. It is a wonderful tool, but it is also a very complex one. Thankfully, the cfe-dev mailing list is full of nice people.

I also started my journey in the LLVM/clang land with the help of this blog post.

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As some may know, I’ve switched from wdl-ol to JUCE 5 for my free plugins. In the past, I had to modify by hand all the projects created by the Projucer. And each time JUCE is updated, I need to add these changes to the generated project.

Not anymore.

On the develop branch, and in the next minor release ATK 2.1.2, modules for the Projucer will be available. This will enable an easier integration of ATK in your project, as you will “just” need to add these modules to the Projucer (and some additional include files to make ATK compliant with JUCE hierarchy).

There are currently 11 new modules (shameless comparison, that’s far more than the new DSP module, even if there are some filters than I’m missing, but feel free to propose a pull request with new features!).

See the explanation on the release branch and let me know what you think: https://github.com/mbrucher/AudioTK/tree/develop/modules/JUCE

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As some may have seen online, ROLI released a new version of JUCE. The nice thing is that they added a new tier for people like me who don’t sell plugins but who don’t want to release their code under the GPL license for diverse reasons (for me, it was formerly incompatibility between VST3 license and the GPL).

With JUCE 5, you have support for all major APIS, from VST2 to Audio Unit v3 and also AAX or VST3. And you can develop your own plugins. The caveat with this tier is that you have a splash screen and a tracking of your users… (actually, there is a flag to remove both). the advantage is that on MacOS, there is no more SDK conflicts, and I have Audio Unit 3 support

So I’ve started playing with Projucer and built a barebone ATK plugin that doesn’t do anything. What I can say is that the worst part is handling universal binaries, support 32bits plugins, as the JUCE project builder overwrites all my changes. Even adding ATK is painful with the project manager.

So instead, I’m going the WDL-OL here, and keeping this ATKJUCE plugin as the simple plugin I’ll duplicate by changing the names and its content. I have my builders that build the plugins and creates the installers, all that while keeping the same JUCE core code (it is shared by all plugins).

The next step is trying to make sense of the API to build a nicer GUI than what I currently have (probably something flat). Indeed, the tutorials on the GUI are small and too basic, but WDL-OL was no better in that aspect, but with more examples.

This entry is part 1 of 4 in the series Audio Toolkit algorithms

I’ve started working on adaptive filtering a long time ago, but could never figure out why my simple implementation of the RLS algorithm failed. Well, there was a typo in the reference book!

Now that this is fixed, let’s see what this guy does.

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Sometimes Visual Studio and Xcode projects just get out of hand. The private project I’m working on has 130 subprojects, all in a single solution, that’s just too much to display in one window. And then I learnt that projects can actually be moved to folders, just like what is possible for files in a project (so you don’t have Source Files and Header Files, but something custom, for instance following the file hierarchy).

They are activated differently, and it’s sometimes not as straightforward, but it works great once it is set up. And as this works for Xcode projects and Visual Studio projects, I was really eager to sort out my Audio Toolkit main project, so it will be the basis of the tests here.

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