Tag Archives: Scientific computing

Playing with a Bela (1): Turning it on and compiling Audio Toolkit

I have now some time to play with this baby:

Beagleboard with Bela extension
Beagleboard with Bela extension

The CPU may not be blazingly fast, but I hope I can still do something with it. The goal of this series will be to try different algorithms and see how they behave on the platform.
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Audio Toolkit: Transient splitter

After my transient shaper, some people told me it would be nice to have a splitter: split the signal in two tracks, one with the transient, another with the sustain. For instance, it would be interesting to apply a different distortion on both signals.

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On modeling posts

I’m currently considering whether I should do more posts on preamps modeling or just keep implementing filters/plugins. Of course, it’s not one or the other, there are different options in this poll:

Modeling preamps: more or less?

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So the idea is to ask my readers what they actually want. I can explain how the new triodes filters are implemented, how they behave, but I can also add new filters in Audio Toolkit (based on different preamp and amp stages, dedicated to guitars, bass, other instruments), try to optimize them, and finally I can include them in new plugins that could be used by users. Or I can do something completely different.

So if you have any ideas, feel free to say so!

Announcement: Audio ToolKit moves to its own website

I’ve decided to create a real space for Audio ToolKit. The idea is to make it more visible, with a consistent message to the users.

In addition to this move, this blog has move to a subdomain there (and you may have noticed it) and Audio ToolKit documentation as well.

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Announcement: Audio TK 1.1.0

This is mainly a bug fix release. A nasty bug on increasing processing sizes would corrupt the input data and thus change the results. It is advised to upgrade to this release as soon as possible.

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Announcement: Audio TK 1.0.0

This is the first stable release of the Audio Toolkit, after more than a year of development. In addition to the serial pipeline, there is now an option to use TBB to render each chunk in parallel. The pipeline can also return the maximum latency the pipeline possesses if all latency information is given during the build of the pipeline.

Additional filters were also added to complement the current set of filters.

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Audio Toolkit: Different low pass filters

There are several different low pass filters, and as many high pass, band pass, band stop… filters. In Audio toolkit, there are different usual implementation available:

  • Bessel
  • Butterworth
  • Chebyshev type 1
  • Chebyshev type 2
  • Second order
  • Linkwitz-Riley
  • RBJ

and it is possible to implement other, different orders as well…
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Announcement: Audio TK 0.7.0

Focus on this release was on performance. As such the core functions were optimized, as well as some tools and EQ.

A new filter dedicated to fast convolution (using a fixed-size partition with a mix of FFT convolution and explicit FIR filter) with 0 latency was added.

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Audio Toolkit: Zero Latency Efficient Convolution

Convolution is an algorithm that is often used for reverberations. If the equation is easy to understand and to implement, the implementation is costly. The other way of doing it is to use Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), but the direct/crude implementation requires latency. If it is possible to optimize the basic convolution code, it is sometimes more interesting to use a different algorithm, as it is the case here.

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