Tag Archives: Scientific computing

Book review: Parallel Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method

I came across the issue of how to teach a trainee how to write a parallel finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. There are a lot of books on the FDTD, but only a few on parallel ones. So I’ve decided to go for this book, knowing that some chapters won’t apply to our job (wave equations). My goal was to seek a book that would explain the basics of my issues.
Continue reading Book review: Parallel Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method

How to promote High Performance Computing ?

I had this discussion with one of my Ph.D. advisors some months ago when we talked about correctly using the computers we had then (dual cores), and I had almost the same one in my new job here: applied maths (finite differences, signal processing, …) graduate students are not taught how to use current computers, so how could they develop an HPC program correctly?

I think it goes even further than that, and it will be a part of this post. What I see is that trainees and newly-hired people (to some extent myself included) lack a lot of basic Computer Science knowledge, and even IT knowledge.
Continue reading How to promote High Performance Computing ?

Book review: Programming Collective Intelligence: Building Smart Web 2.0 Applications

The book description was really appetizing: Machine Learning applied to the Internet, so it should be easy to understand, and Python as the mean to compute. Unfortunately, contrary to what I saw in different reviews, I was not pleased with the book, and here is why.
Continue reading Book review: Programming Collective Intelligence: Building Smart Web 2.0 Applications

A new French book on scientific computing with Python

Today ships my first book on Python for the scientists. Although IT people can learn a lot of Python with it (mainly if they are working in labs are research centers), scientists will be more interested as it presents a viable alternative to Matlab : fast, efficient, a real language with a large standard library.

After an introduction, the Python language is exposed as well as some main modules. The three central chapters are dedicated to Numpy, Scipy and Matplotlib. Each library tackles a specific problem, storing data, using it or display it. Finally, the last chapter exposes ways of speeding up Python with the use of C or C++.

The link to my publisher : here